Anti-nuclear Movement in Germany

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Anti-nuclear Struggle in Germany

Despite of the internationally known German "nuclear phase-out", it is one of the European countries with the biggest number of atomic plants in operation. As of spring 2013, still nine commercial nuclear reactors are in operation, and it is likely that the goal to close them by 2022 will only be realized with a strong anti-nuclear movement forcing the government and industry to fulfill the promises they made in law.

The official state policy is the phase-out of atomic power. However, the nuclear industry is insisting, campaigning and pushing forwards to annihilate the decisions made in 2011 in response to the disaster in Japan. Hundreds of thousands of people had protested nuclear power in Germany at that point of time forcing the government to close eight of Germany's oldest reactors to pacify the public. In 2011, a politically remarkable occurrence was the change in the conservative Christian Party's main point of view on nuclear power not to promote it officially any more, but to publicly admit it to be too dangerous and to end the atomic age.

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Contents



Castor resistance 2010 in Germany: Nuclear dinosaur
100,000 protested in Berlin against atomic power
About 50,000 People Protested in Berlin Against Nuclear Power (Photo: Andreas Conradt / PubliXviewinG)
A Police Attacked Farmer With Firearm At The Gorleben Treck
Reaction to Police Violence: Puntured Wheel Of A Sprayed Police Van
Activists blocked the gates of the German NPP Krümmel
Blockade action in Krümmel: Concrete, tripods, tractors...
Stock Exchange Action Against Nuclear Investments in Frankfurt/Main (Germany)
Stock Exchange Action: Banner Against Nuclear €nvestments
Stock Exchange Action: The Bomb Next To The Stock Exchange Sign
Stock Exchange Action: Later It Was Placed In Front Of The Entrance Of The Stock Exchange
Stock Exchange Action: The Doors Of The Stocks Exchange Were Closed For A While Because Of The Protest - Nobody Could Enter For This Time
Stock Exchange Action: Nuclear Time Bomb Beside The Stock Exchange Montitor
Stock Exchange Action: The Police Were Already At The Place With Many Police Cars And Officers Minutes Before The Action Started
Stock Exchange Action: At The End The 'Bomb' Was Handed Over To A Representative Of The Stock Exchange
Castor: A tank on its way to the next barricade!

The German Nuclear Phase-Out

This article is written from the point of view of a person who is in involved in one of the several anti-nuclear movements in Germany. Other people would surely tell the story from a different angle.

Why did Germany decide to start pulling away from their dependence on nuclear energy?

Beforehand one remark: It seems that many people in many countries around the world have the impression that the fact that there is no possibility to construct a new nuclear power plant in Germany and that there is much resistance against any nuclear developments would depend on the government's decision to phase-out the German nuclear power plants. But it is the other way around: after decades of fights between nuclear industry, governments and the anti-nuclear movement the federal government changed its mind in 1998. They started to adopt a position that had already manifested itself as a reality: there was no way of establishing new nuclear power plants.

But: while the new government said they want to phase-out nuclear power the same parties approved the extension of the Uranium Enrichment Facility in Gronau to multiply the production of fuel for nuclear power plants. And the "Nuclear Consent" called peace treaty wasn't negotiated with an important player - the anti-nuclear movement. Eventually the nuclear phase-out was the product of the negotiations of the political parties (mainly the Social Democrats) and the main nuclear companies. Due to this fact the Nuclear Consent wasn't backed by an important force of the society. Some believe that including anti-nuclear NGOs in the treaty could have prevented to revoke the nuclear phase-out by a later government.

The challenge of dependency on only one or two energy sources was already known in Germany - the oil crisis of the 1970s showed that this dependency is dangerous. So at the beginning many supporters of the nuclear industry argued that nuclear power would help to gain more independence from oil etc. In later discussions the dependency on Uranium also became an aspect, and environmentalists argued that being dependent on certain (especially: non-renewable) energy sources is not good to supply the society's electricity demands.

But in the end the main reason for the change in policies was a political decision that was caused by the long-term and strong resistance against nuclear power in Germany.

Was this a political decision or was it brought about by anti-nuclear pressure?

Both. Since the 1970s a huge movement against nuclear power had been established in Germany. Besides all the "normal" small activities like information events, educational work, local actions etc., some big events took place and showed the anti-nuclear resistance of great parts of the population: there were several demonstrations against nuclear plants with some 100,000 people, as well as occupations of planned nuclear facilities with huge numbers of supporters. And, probably very important, there was a great diversity of different kinds of actions, strategies and ideas how to fight against nuclear power. Eventually this mixture of very different people and their ways to resist prevented several nuclear power plants from being constructed, being taken into operation, or being operated for more than a few months.

Some famous names of huge battles against nuclear power are the sites Wackersdorf, Brokdorf and Gorleben. The state was very pro-nuclear and wanted to push through their policy with nearly every means possible. They used riot police with tear gas, projectiles, water cannons and batons against protesters which were mostly peaceful at the beginning. There are even pictures of women with baby carriages being attacked by water cannons and tear gas. In many cases people fought back - the police violence caused the radicalization of many people. Many were injured during the battles, some died of police violence. The catastrophe in Chernobyl triggered off the establishment of new strong anti-nuclear movements in Germany. In many cases the nuclear companies gave up because of the long-term and powerful protests. In other cases politicians decided that it is politically impossible to enforce nuclear power (e.g. the planned Center for waste disposal in Germany that was proposed to include a reprocessing unit, fast breeder power station and other nuclear facilities).

In the 1990s the social movements lost their strength, this also applied to the anti-nuclear movements. But as it was a very strong movement before, it remained an important social issue with many groups, direct action and permanent educational work. Anyway, it didn't reach the old size and strength again. In the second half of the 1990s the movement grew again because of the first transports of high level radioactive waste to the temporary repository in Gorleben. By 2001 with every Castor (cask for the transport and storage of radioactive materials) transport the resistance became bigger. In 2001 some 20,000 people protested against the transport.

In 1998 the new government (after nearly two decades the Social Democrats formed a government again - together with the Green Party) decided Germany's nuclear phase-out. The nuclear topic was a major issue in the election campaigns of both parties, so they had to act upon it. But they didn't fulfill their promises: the so-called "abandonment of nuclear energy" was nothing more than an enactment of the actual political situation at this time. The new law said that no new nuclear power plants would be allowed to be constructed - but this was no new situation as it was clear that the resistance against such endeavours was too strong. It stressed that government policy decides about the use of nuclear energy and not the companies - this should go without saying. And it declared a moratorium for the proposed final disposal site in Germany of up to ten years - and this was no decision against the Gorleben site.

On the other hand, the nuclear phase-out law allowed the nuclear companies to produce a certain amount of electricity with the existing power plants and gave them a formal right to do so. The government committed itself not to try and stop the nuclear power stations earlier, especially not to use fiscal means (e.g. taxes on nuclear power) to restrict nuclear power. And the final disposal site "Schacht Konrad" was sacrificed (= the resistance of the parties against this project was stopped) in order to convince the nuclear industry to agree with the new law. Anyway, at the end of the day the nuclear phase-out law was no progress but full of concessions to the nuclear industry.

Nowadays the so-called German nuclear phase-out serves another issue: it works as a positive signal towards other countries and gives some backing to arguments against nuclear plans in Germany brought forth by certain interest groups including some political parties. Even if the context of this "phase-out" was not so positive at the time it was introduced, it is an important symbol for anti-nuclear resistance today.

Was the inability to dispose of high-level waste one of the reasons for abandoning nuclear?

The unsolved problem of nuclear waste disposal is an important argument against nuclear power. For this reason it will also have influenced the decision for the nuclear phase-out law. But the discussions were not so much about detail problems but about nuclear power in general. In my memory the issue was discussed as well-known that nuclear power is dangerous and that there are further problems such as the unsolved disposal of the waste (not only high level radioactive), destructive and indigenous people exploiting Uranium mining, proliferation etc.

Did the decision to abandon nuclear and pursue renewable energy occur at the same time?

It was connected with each other, somehow. Of course, renewable energy policies started long time before. Even the conservative government couldn't deny the importance and prospects of renewable sources and started a programme to sponsor those energies. It was called the "Energy Feed-In Law" and it stipulated certain amounts of money the electricity companies had to pay for power from renewable sources of private producers. So a fixed price was guaranteed for renewable energies and people could invest in this technology without high risks. The first renewable boom was triggered off by this law.

In 1998, when the Social Democrats and the Green Party formed the government (and introduced the "Nuclear Phase-Out Law") a new renewable energy law was established: the "Renewable Energy Law". It increased the support for renewable energies once more.

The phase-out policy required something like the renewable energy law, because it was clear that alternatives are necessary if the abandonment of nuclear energy was to be carried through with. So it was a logical consequence of the nuclear phase-out policy.

Anyway, the establishment of renewable energies was not the precondition for a nuclear phase-out policy. Both were caused by political pressure of the anti-nuclear movement in the decade before. Many anti-nuclear activists had early on demanded for substantial sponsoring of the use of renewable energy sources and many of them had campaigned for renewable energies or created first enterprises in this sector.

Did the majority of German people support getting rid of nuclear power?

A long time the majority of the population was anti-nuclear. But the governments and the industry ignored the public opinion and continued the pro-nuclear policy for a long time. When the government decided to make the nuclear phase-out official at the end of the last century, about 75 % of the population wanted a nuclear phase-out.

The government of Social Democrats and Green Party was in some ways a step backwards for the environmental scene as many people believed that everything will become good now and many environmental (and also anti-nuclear) activities stopped over the first years of the new government. Another consequence was that environmentalists saying that it's not enough what the government does were seen to be extremists - the public believed that the environmentalists already are in the government and that everyone who demands more was crazy or at least not serious.

It was a hard way for the movement to reconstitute and to develop critical positions towards the "green government's policy" and to gain strength again. Up to last year the public opinion towards nuclear power had become less clear anti-nuclear than before the nuclear phase-out policy, only a few more than 50 % wanted the abandonment of nuclear energy.

These days a clear majority of more than 70 % is anti-nuclear again. Caused was this development by the pro-nuclear propaganda of the conservative party that believed to make an election campaign with this topic. But the opposite occured: Many people understood that clear anti-nuclear positions are needed and made their stances like this.



History

The anti-nuclear movement in Germany has a long history dating back to the early 1970s, when large demonstrations prevented the construction of a nuclear plant at Wyhl. Anti-nuclear success at Wyhl inspired nuclear opposition throughout Germany, in other parts of Europe, and in North America.

Early years

The tiny hamlet of Wyhl, in the southwestern corner of Germany, was first mentioned in 1971 as a possible site for a nuclear power station. In the years that followed, local opposition steadily mounted, but this had little impact on politicians and planners. Official permission for the plant was granted and earthworks began on 17 February 1975.[1] On 18 February, local people spontaneously occupied the site and police removed them forcibly two days later. Television coverage of police dragging away farmers and their wives helped to turn nuclear power into a major national issue, with subsequent support coming particularly from the nearby university town of Freiburg. On 23 February about 30,000 people re-occupied the Wyhl site and plans to remove them were abandoned by the state government in view of the large number involved and potential for more adverse publicity. On 21 March 1975, an administrative court withdrew the construction licence for the plant.[2][3][4] The plant was never built and the land eventually became a nature reserve.[4]

The Wyhl occupation generated extensive national debate. This initially centred on the state government's handling of the affair and associated police behaviour, but interest in nuclear issues was also stimulated. The Wyhl experience encouraged the formation of citizen action groups near other planned nuclear sites.[2] Many other anti-nuclear groups formed elsewhere, in support of these local struggles, and some existing citizens' action groups widened their aims to include the nuclear issue. This is how the German anti-nuclear movement evolved.[2] Anti-nuclear success at Wyhl also inspired nuclear opposition in the rest of Europe and North America.[3][1]


Other protests

In 1976 and 1977, mass demonstrations took place at Kalkar, the site of Germany's first FBR, and at Brokdorf, north of Hamburg.[2] The circumstances at Brokdorf were similar to those at Wyhl, in that the behaviour of the police was again crucial:

The authorities had rushed through the licensing process, and police occupied the site hours before the first construction license was granted, in order to prevent a repetition of Wyhl. Demonstrators trying to enter the site a few days later got harsh treatment, and all this helped consolidate the population in opposition.[2]

In February 1977 the prime minister of Lower Saxony, Ernst Albrecht of the Christian Democratic Union, announced that the salt mines in Gorleben would be utilised to store radioactive waste. New protests by the local population and opponents of nuclear power broke out and approximately 20,000 people attended the first large demonstration in Gorleben on March 12, 1977. Protests about Gorleben continued for many years.[5]

In the early 1980s plans to build a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in the Bavarian town of Wackersdorf lead to major protests. In 1986, West German police were confronted by demonstrators armed with slingshots, crowbars and Molotov cocktails at the site of a nuclear reprocessing plant in Wackersdorf.[6][7] The plans for the plant were abandoned in 1988. It still isn't clear whether protests or plant economics led to the decision.[4]

In 1981, Germany's largest anti-nuclear demonstration took place to protest against the construction of the Brokdorf Nuclear Power Plant on the North Sea coast west of Hamburg. Some 100,000 people came face to face with 10,000 police officers. Twenty-one policemen were injured by demonstrators armed with gasoline bombs, sticks, stones and high-powered slingshots.[8][9][10] The plant began operations in October 1986 and is scheduled to close in 2018.[4]


Recent developments

The anti-nuclear protests were also a driving force of the green movement in Germany, from which the party The Greens evolved. When they first came to power in the Schröder administration of 1998 they achieved their major political goal for which they had fought for 20 years: abandoning nuclear energy in Germany.

In 2002, the "Act on the structured phase-out of the utilization of nuclear energy for the commercial generation of electricity" took effect, following a drawn-out political debate and lengthy negotiations with nuclear power plant operators. The act legislated for the shut-down of all German nuclear plants by 2021. The Stade Nuclear Power Plant was the first one to go offline in November 2003, followed by the Obrigheim Nuclear Power Plant in 2005. Block-A of the Biblis Nuclear Power Plant is still provisionally scheduled to be shut down in 2008.[4][11] Block-B is going back online after a year-long shutdown on December 13 or 14, 2007 and is scheduled to keep operating until 2009 or 2012.[12]

In 2007, amid concerns that Russian energy supplies to western Europe may not be reliable, conservative politicians, including Chancellor Angela Merkel and Economics Minister Michael Glos, continued to question the decision to phase out nuclear power in Germany.[4] WISE along with other anti-nuclear movement groups contend that the climate problem can only be solved by the use of renewable forms of energy along with efficient and economical energy technologies.[13]

In November 2008, a shipment of radioactive waste from German nuclear plants arrived at a storage site near Gorleben after being delayed by large protests from nuclear activists. More than 15,000 people took part in the protests which involved blocking trucks with sit-down demonstrations and blocking the route with tractors. The demonstrations were partly a response to conservative calls for a rethink of the planned phaseout of nuclear power stations.[14][15]


Anti-nuclear groups and organizations in Germany

  1. AFLUM - Atomkraftfrei leben in der Uckermark
    • AFLUM, Untere Dorfstraße 20, D-16307 Mescherin; phone: +49 151 28255890; info AT aflum.de[16]
    • Volker Schmidt Roy (Press Officer)
    • Alexander Mempel (Representative)
    • Jörg Strutzke (Public Relations, Recording Secretary)
  2. AAA - Aktion Atommüllfreie Asse
    • Manfred Kracht, Am Hopfengarten 17, D-38304 Wolfenbüttel; phone: +49 5331 298950; info AT aaa-wf.de[16]
    • Margret Toepfer, Tel. +49 05331/78440, margrettoepfer AT gmx.de [16]
    • Ursula Kleber, Tel. + 49 05332/3547, UKleber AT t-online.de [16]
    • Postal Address: Manfred Kracht, Am Hopfengarten 17, 38304 Wolfenbüttel; http://aaa-wf.de
  3. Ahauser Christen gegen Atomenergie
  4. aetsch - Anti-AKW-Gruppe Heidelberg
    • Eine Welt Zentrum, c/o Karlstorbahnhof, Am Karlstor 1, D-69117 Heidelberg; phone: +49 6221 978927
  5. Akte Nix - Anti-Atom-Info
  6. Aktion Z Unterweser
    • Bürgerinitiative Aktion Z, Jürgen Janssen, Abser Deich, D-26935 Stadland; info AT aktion-z.de[16]
    • Dr. Ingo Harms, Oldenburg; phone: +49 441 52333
    • Elke Kuik-Janssen, Rodenkirchen; phone: +49 4732 2355
    • Hans-Otto Meyer-Ott, Brake; phone: +49 4401 3813
    • Press Officers:
      • Hinrich Brader, Beckum; phone: +49 4732 348
      • Jürgen Janssen, Rodenkirchen; phone: +49 4732 2355, +49 172 9074705
  7. Aktionsbündnis Anti-Atom Magdeburg
    • c/o einewelt haus Magdeburg, Schellingstraße 3-4, D-39104 Magdeburg
    • Kirsten Neubig, Dorfstr. 11, D-39638 Zobbenitz; +49 151 17529919
    • anti_atom_magdeburg AT gmx.de[16]
    • regular meetings every 1st and 3rd Monday a month at eineWelt Haus in Magdeburg
  8. Aktionsbündnis Atommüll-Lager Obrigheim
  9. Aktionsbündnis "Bielefeld steigt aus"
    • Christian Heißenberg, Wertherstr. 30a, D-33615 Bielefeld
  10. Aktionsbündnis Castor-Widerstand Neckarwestheim
  11. Aktionsbündnis Energiewende Heilbronn
  12. Aktionsbündnis Fessenheim stilllegen. JETZT!
  13. Aktionsbündnis gegen Atomenergie Aachen
  14. Aktionsbündnis gegen die Verlängerung der AKW-Laufzeiten Castrop-Rauxel
  15. Aktionsbündnis Münsterland gegen Atomanlagen
  16. Aktionsbündnis Ottersberg
    • Christina Stalhammar, Lange Str. 19, D-28870 Ottersberg; phone: +49 42054399885
  17. Aktionsbündnis Stop Westcastor
  18. Aktionsgemeinschaft antiatom-oa
  19. Aktionskreises Stilllegen Sofort - AKW Brokdorf
  20. AKU - Arbeitskreis Umwelt Wiesbaden
    • phone/fax: +49 611 9451351
    • meetings every Tuesday at 8 PM
  21. AKW-NEE Bergedorf
  22. AKW-Nee-Gruppe Aachen
  23. Antiatominitiative Göttingen
  24. AntiAtom-Bündnis Niederrhein[17]
  25. AntiAtom-Euskirchen (AAE)
  26. Antiatom-fuku
  27. Anti Atom Berlin
    • c/o Stadtteilladen, Warschauer Str. 23, D-10243 Berlin; postal address: Görlitzer Ufer 1a, D-10997 Berlin; phone: +49 30 61201791; kontakt AT antiatomberlin.de[16]
  28. Anti Atom Belzig
  29. Anti Atom Gruppe Karlsruhe ATOM-AG
    • A.T.O.M.AG der Projektwerkstatt Spunk, Steinstr. 23, D-76133 Karlsruhe; phone: +49 721 3545740; anti-atom-karlsruhe AT gmx.de[16]
    • meetings on Wednesdays at 8 PM - better ask before!
  30. Anti Atom Initiative Oberhausen
  31. AntiAtomNetz Trier
    • c/o Umweltzentrum Trier, Pfützenstr. 1, D-54290 Trier
  32. AntiAtomFreiburg
  33. AntiAtomOldenburg
  34. antiAtom-Plenum Kassel[18]
  35. AntiAtomPlenum Göttingen
  36. Anti-AKW-Gruppe Linzgau
  37. Anti-AKW-Initiative Groß-Gerau
  38. Anti-Atomplenum-Weserbergland
  39. Anti-Atom-Halle
  40. Anti-Atom-Kreis Nienburg
  41. Anti-Atom-Spaziergangs Wilhelmshaven
  42. Anti-Atom-Würzburg
  43. Anti-Atom Bündnis NordOst
  44. Anti-Atom Hersfeld-Rotenburg
  45. Anti-Atom-Braunschweig
    • regular meetings every 1st and 3rd Monday a month at Schimmelhof B2, Hamburgerstr. 273b
  46. Anti-Atom-Bündnis Aschaffenburg
  47. Anti-Atom-Bündnis Giessen[19]
    • regular meetings every Monday at 7.30 PM at Pit's Pinte (Grünberger Str.)
  48. Anti-Atom-Bündnis Kempten
  49. Anti-Atom-Bündnis Lübeck
    • c/o AKZENT, Hüxstr. 83-85, D-23552 Lübeck
    • regular meetings every Thursday at 7.30 PM at AKZENT, Hüxstr. 83-85 (entry via gate at no. 79)
  50. Anti-Atom-Bündnis Minden
  51. Anti-Atom-Bündnis Schaumburg
  52. Anti-Atom-Büro Hamburg[20]
  53. Anti-Atom-Gruppe Bonn
  54. Anti-Atom-Gruppe Flensburg
    • Norderstraße 41, D-24939 Flensburg
    • meetings at Infoladen Subtilus
  55. Anti-Atom-Gruppe Mannheim
    • c/o Bücherladen Neckarstadt, Kobellstr. 17, D-68167 Mannheim
  56. Anti-Atom-Gruppe Osnabrück
  57. Anti-Atom-Initiative Greifswald
    • Lange Straße 14, D-17498 Greifswald
    • meetings at Klex
  58. Anti-Atom-Initiative im Kreis Pinneberg
  59. Anti-Atom-Montagsspaziergänge:
  60. Anti-Atom-Netz Koblenz/nördl. Rheinland-Pfalz
    • Egbert Bialk, BUND-Koblenz, Koblenzer Umweltbüro (KUB.A), Eltzerhofstr. 10, D-56068 Koblenz; phone: +49 261 94249722; e.bialk AT t-online.de[16]
  61. Anti-Atom-Plenum Berlin
  62. Anti-Atom-Plenum Bochum
    • fax: +49 234 9230931185
  63. Anti-Atom-Plenum Marburg
  64. Anti-Atom-Plenum Thüringen
    • Johannisstraße 14, D-07743 Jena
  65. Anti-Atom-Proteste Thüringen
  66. Anti-Castor-Bündnis Düsseldorf
  67. Anti-Castor-Plenum Jena
  68. Arbeitskreis gegen Atomanlagen
  69. Arbeitsgemeinschaft Schacht Konrad e.V.
  70. Arbeitskreis gegen das AKW Philippsburg
  71. Arbeitskreis Umwelt (AKU) Gronau
  72. Asse II Koordinationskreis (A2K)
  73. Asse-II - Braunschweig
  74. Atomausstieg jetzt! Aktionsbündnis Region Ulm/Neu-Ulm
  75. Atomausstieg Kulmbach
  76. Atomausstieg selber machen!
    • c/o NaturFreunde Deutschlands e.V., Warschauer Str. 58a, D-10243 Berlin; phone: +49 800 7626852 (freecall)
  77. AtomErbe Obrigheim[21]
  78. atomisches Café
  79. atomkraftENDE.darmstadt
    • regular meetings every 2nd and 4th Thursday a month at 8 PM in the Oetinger Villa, Kranichsteiner Str. 81, D-64289 Darmstadt, Projektwerkstatt (1st floor); atomkraftENDE.darmstadt AT gmx.de[16]
  80. Atomkraftfreies Japan Sayonara Genpatsu Düsseldorf e.V.
  81. atomplenum Hannover
    • phone: +49 511 458 14 03; fax: +49 1805 28131182815; info AT atomplenum.de[16]
    • Christian Deußing, Beesem 12, D-29587 Luckau; visdp AT atomplenum.de[16]
    • regular meetings every 2nd Thursday a months and if necessary at 8 PM at Stärkestraße 15 in Hannover-Linden
  82. Atomreaktor Wannsee dichtmachen!
  83. Attac - Gruppe Herford
  84. aufpASSEn e.V.
  85. A.K.W.Ende Bergstraße
  86. Badisch-Elsässische Bürgerinitiativen
  87. Bäuerliche Notgemeinschaft Lüchow-Dannenberg
  88. BI AntiAtom Ludwigsburg[22]
  89. BI Cuxhaven ohne Atomtransporte
    • E. Roskosch-Buntemeyer, Klaus-Groth-Str. 11, D-27472 Cuxhaven
  90. BI "Energiewende für Waldkirch"
  91. BI Energiewende Reutlingen
  92. BI gegen atomare Anlagen Weiden-Neustadt
    • Leuchtenberger Straße 7a, D-92637 Weiden
  93. BI Kernenergie zur Förderung alternativer Energiekonzepte
    • phone: +49 3834 594876, +49 174 5842336 (mobile); fax: +49 3834 892150
  94. BI Morsleben - Initiative gegen das Atommüllendlager Morsleben e.V.
  95. BI Oberberg Süd
    • meeting every first Monday the month at Pfannkuchenhaus, Hauptstr. 60 in Nümbrecht
  96. BI PrigniX
  97. Brokdorf Akut
  98. Bund der Bürgerinitiativen Mittlerer Neckar e.V. (BBMN)
    • Wolfram Scheffbuch, Oberdorfstraße 9, D-74366 Kirchheim am Neckar; phone: +49 7143 94668, +49 173 7397214 (mobile); fax: +49 3222 3743101; kontakt AT bbmn.de[16]
  99. Bundesverband Bürgerinitiativen Umweltschutz (BBU) e.V.
  100. Bundesverband Christliche Demokraten gegen Atomkraft (CDAK)
    • Postfach 421713, D-55072 Mainz; phone: +49 171 1049920
  101. Bündnis AKW Brunsbüttel stilllegen - jetzt!
  102. Bündnis Anti-Atom Ostwestfalen-Lippe
  103. Bündnis Energiewende Bülstedt und Umzu
  104. Bündnis für Atomausstieg Landshut (BüfA)
  105. Bündnis für Atomausstieg und erneuerbare Energien
  106. Bündnis für den Atomausstieg Freising
  107. Bündnis für den Atomausstieg Siegerland
  108. Bündnis für Erneuerbare Energien Winsen
    • Wilfried Staake, Hoopter Elbdeich 60, D-21423 Winsen; phone: +49 4171 64712, +49 4171 654235; wstaake AT freenet.de[16]
    • Bernd Meyer; phone: +49 4179 750950, +49 4171 71510, +49 170 8834885 (mobile)
    • Sabine Lehmbeck; phone: +49 4171 2519
    • Rafael Wehrspann; phone: +49 4171 667151, +49 176 20195969 (mobile)
    • Anja Stoeck; phone: +49 170 9352209 (mobile)
  109. Bündnis gegen Atomkraft Leipzig
  110. Bündnis gegen Atommülllager Hanau
  111. Bündnis Neckar castorfrei
  112. Bündnis Strahlenzug
    • phone: +49 2166 6736576
  113. Bürger gegen Atomreaktor Garching e.V.
  114. Bürger in Hamm gegen Atom
    • Bürgerinitiative Umweltschutz Hamm e.V., Postfach 1242, D-59002 Hamm
  115. BürgerAktionSichere Asse (BASA)
  116. Bürgerbewegung atomfreies Geldern (BAG)
    • c/o Jordi Preußer, Brühlscher Weg 72, D-47608 Geldern; phone: +49 28311219392
    • Bärbel van Doornick: phone: +49 28319269157
  117. Bürgerinitiative Kein Atommüll Einlagerung Stopp Harrislee
  118. Bürgerinitiative Cattenom-Non-Merci
  119. Bürgerinitiative gegen die atomare Bedrohung Saarwellingen
  120. Bürgerinitiative gegen Leukämie in der Elbmarsch
  121. Bürgerinitiative Gochsheim
    • Babs Günther, Weyerer Str. 58b, D-97469 Gochsheim; phone: +49 9721 61187
  122. Bürgerinitiative Kein Atommüll in Ahaus e.V.
  123. Bürgerinitiative Leben ohne Atomkraft Griese Gegend
    • Ludger Klus, Feldstraße 3, D-19288 Leussow; phone: +49 38754 20141
  124. Bürgerinitiative „Mahnwache für Atomausstieg Freudenstadt“
  125. Bürgerinitiative Region Dahlenburg e.V.
  126. Bürgeriniative Südheide e.V.
  127. Bürgerinitiative Umweltschutz e.V. (BIU)
  128. Bürgerinitiative Umweltschutz Hamm e.V.
  129. Bürgerinitiative Umweltschutz Lüchow-Dannenberg e.V.
  130. Bürgerinitiative StrahlenSchutz (BISS) e.V.
    • 1st chairperson: Thomas Huk, Lahwiese 29, D-38110 Braunschweig-Thune
    • 2nd chairperson: Peter Meyer, Ziegelmasch 19, D-38110 Braunschweig-Thune
  131. Bürgerinnen und Bürger für eine nachhaltige Energiepolitik
  132. BürgerInneninitiative gegen Atomanlagen Uelzen
  133. BürgerInnen-Initiative gegen Atomkraft
  134. Buxtehuder Mahnwache für den Atomausstieg
  135. bye-bye-Biblis
  136. Castorgruppe Dahlenburg
    • Ulrich Kapp, Nieperfitz 19, D-21369 Nahrendorf
  137. Castorgruppe Dannenberg
  138. Castorgruppe Hitzacker
  139. castorstop
  140. Castor-Gruppe Bremen
  141. Celler Forum gegen Atomenergie
    • c/o Buntes Haus e.V., Hannoversche Str. 30f, D-29221 Celle; forum-gegen-atomenergie AT gmx.de[16]
    • regular meeting every 2nd Tuesday a months at 8 PM at Buntes Haus, Hannoversche Str. 30f.
  142. ContrAtom
  143. Countdown 2021 - Fakten und Positionen zum Atomausstieg a campaign of "Naturfreundejugend Deutschland"
    • Kinder- und Jugendwerk der Naturfreunde - Verein zur Förderung der Naturfreundejugend Deutschlands e.V., Warschauer Str. 59a, D-10243 Berlin; phone: +49 30 29773270; fax: +49 30 29773280; info AT naturfreundejugend.de[16]
  144. Duisburg Atomfrei
  145. Ebersberger Bündnis für den Atomausstieg
  146. Elterninitiative Geesthacht
    • Postfach 2031, D-21498 Geesthacht
  147. Energiewendebündnis Nürnberg
    • Wurzelbauerstr. 29, D-90409 Nürnberg
  148. Energiewendeinitiative Naumburg
  149. Ermittlungsausschuss Gorleben (EA)
  150. Träger- und Unterstützerkreis "Endlich abschalten"
  151. Feuergruppe
  152. FORUM - Gemeinsam gegen das Zwischenlager und für eine verantwortbare Energiepolitik e.V.
  153. Frauen aktiv gegen Atomenergie
  154. Freischaffende AtomkraftgegnerInnen Moers/Neukirchen-Vluyn[23]
  155. Friedberger Aktionsbündnis - Wir stellen uns quer
  156. Fukushima Mahnwache - Initiative Atomstrom freie Probstei
  157. Fürther Bündnis "Atomausstieg JETZT"
  158. Gesellschaft für Strahlenschutz e.V.
  159. Gewissensruhe - Ehrenfriedhof für MDB nach dem Super-Gau
  160. Gorleben Archiv e.V.
  161. Gorlebener Gebet
  162. Grohnde-abschalten.de
  163. Grohnde-Kampagne
  164. Gutes Leben Güstrow
  165. Hildesheim steigt aus (formerly: Aktionsbündnis Hildesheimer Atomausstieg)
  166. Ini ausgestrahlt Tuttlingen
  167. Initiative "Atomausstieg jetzt!"
  168. Institut zur Förderung von Akzeptanzproblemen in der Atomenergie
  169. International Chernobyl Network
  170. Internationales Aktionsbündnis gegen Cattenom
  171. IPPNW - Deutsche Sektion der Internationalen Ärzte für die Verhütung des Atomkrieges / Ärzte in sozialer Verantwortung e.V.
  172. Jugend gegen Atomkraft
    • Rosenweg 3, D-79295 Laufen
  173. Kampagne Tschüss Vattenfall - Hamburg steigt um!
  174. Kein Leben mit atomaren Risiken! (KLAR!) e.V.
  175. Kids gegen Atomkraft
  176. Klägergemeinschaft "Atomkraftwerk Obrigheim abschalten"
    • Dr. med. Walter Sieber, Freih.-v.-Steinweg 21, D-74821 Mosbach; phone: +49 6261 670470; fax: +49 6261 670472
  177. Klimacamp Gruppe Mainz
  178. Kölner Anti-Atom Plenum
  179. Koordinationskreis gegen Atomkraft Saar e.V.
    • c/o VSJS, Mainzer Str. 35, D-66111 Saarbrücken; phone: +49 681 635359
  180. Kölner Gegenstrom gegen Atomanlagen
  181. Langen gegen Atomkraft
  182. LAUT sein gegen Atomkraft
  183. Lüneburger Aktionsbündnis gegen Atom (LAGA)
  184. Mahnwache Gundremmingen
    • Thomas u. Carola Wolf, Hauptstrasse 204, D-89343 Jettingen-Scheppach; phone: +49 8225 1282; info AT mahnwache-gundremmingen.de[16]992033
    • Koni Link, Ritter-Rehm-Str. 27, D-86502 Laugna; phone: +49 8272 992033
    • regular meetings every Sunday at 3 PM at the main gate of the Gundremmingen NPP
  185. Martfelder gegen Atom
  186. MegA - Menschen gegen AtomAnlagen Waltrop
  187. Messen für Aktiven Umweltschutz (MAUS) Trier
  188. Meßstelle für Arbeits- und Umweltschutz e.V. (MAUS)
  189. Mobilisierender Musik Kampf Wagen (MMKW)
    • Bürgerinitiative Umweltschutz, Lüchow-Dannenberg e.V., Rosenstrasse 20, D-29439 Lüchow, mmkw AT mmkw.de[16]
  190. Morsleben-Netzwerk
  191. Morsleben-Projekt
  192. Mütter gegen Atomkraft e.V.
  193. Netzwerk Energiewende Lübeck
  194. nirgendwo.info - repression against anti-nuclear activists - overview on & support for trials
  195. niXatom - anti-atom-news aus Berlin
    • phone: +49 30 7821329
    • regular meetings every 2nd Monday at 7.30 PM in room EB226 at the TU Berlin in the so-called Erweiterungsbau (EB)
  196. Nuclear Heritage Network
  197. Nürnberger Antiatomaktion
  198. Otto Hug Strahleninstitut
  199. Plattform gegen Temelin e.V.
  200. PodCastor.de
  201. ProgA - Provinz gegen Atomanlagen
  202. Projekt "Steine für Morsleben"
  203. Projektgruppe Anti-Atomkraft der FH-Aachen
  204. Rechtshilfegruppe Gorleben
  205. SAND - Systemoppositionelle Atomkraft Nein Danke Gruppe Hamburg
  206. Sauerland gegen Atomkraft
  207. Sayonara Nukes Berlin
  208. Schülerinitiative gegen Atomanlagen Uelzen
  209. Schweinfurter Aktions-Bündnis gegen Atomkraft
    • Babs Günther, Weyerer Str. 58b, D-97469 Gochsheim; phone: +49 9721 61187
  210. Siemens-Boykott
  211. SofA Münster - Initiative für den Sofortigen Atomausstieg
  212. Stop Bure Gruppe Trier (Ex-IfAT)
  213. Störfall Atomkraft
    • phone/fax: +49 6593 989261
  214. Strahlemenschen Ribnitz
  215. Strahlendes Klima e.V.
  216. Südwestdeutsche Anti-Atom-Initiativen
  217. Twistringer Atomkraftgegner
  218. Wahlwieser Block
  219. wartegleis.blogsport.de
    • phone: +49 151 21689788 (mobile)
  220. WiderSetzen
  221. widerStands-Nest
  222. Wolfenbütteler AtomAusstiegsGruppe - Initiative für eine nachhaltige Energiepolitik (WAAG)
  223. X-tausendmal quer
  224. .ausgestrahlt


Groups and organizations also working on the anti-nuclear field

  1. BUND für Umwelt und Naturschutz Deutschland e.V.
  2. Jugenorganisation Bund Naturschutz
    • Landesstelle, Trivastr. 13, D-80637 München; phone: +49 89 15989630; fax: +49 89 15989633; schlein AT jbn.de[16]
  3. Bundesarbeitsgemeinschaft "Den Kindern von Tschernobyl" e.V.
  4. Campact e.V.
  5. Deutsche Umwelthilfe (DUH) e.V.
    • MAIN OFFICE: Fritz-Reichle-Ring 4, D-78315 Radolfzell; phone: +49 7732 99950; fax: +49 7732 999577; info AT duh.de[16]
    • BERLIN OFFICE: Hackescher Markt 4, D-10178 Berlin; phone: +49 30 24008670; fax: +49 30 240086719
    • NORTHERN REGIONAL ASSOCIATION: Goebenstr. 3a, D-30161 Hannover; phone: +49 511 3908050; fax: +49 511 39080519
  6. Deutsche Umweltstiftung
    • Burg Guttenberg, Burgstr. 12, D-74855 Neckarmühlbach; phone: +49 6266 23795400; fax: +49 6266 23795409
  7. Demosanitäter - Sanitätsgruppe Demokratisches Zentrum
  8. Greenkids e.V.
  9. Greenpeace e.V.
  10. Kritisches Kollektiv
  11. Kurve Wustrow
  12. Robin Wood
  13. Umweltzentrum Braunschweig
  14. urgewald
    • Hauptgeschäftsstelle SASSENBERG: Von Galen Str. 4, D-48336 Sassenberg; phone: +49 2583 1031; fax: +49 2583 4220; katrin AT urgewald.de[16]
    • Geschäftsstelle BERLIN: Marienstrasse 19/20, D-10117 Berlin; phone: +49 30 28482271; regine AT urgewald.de[16]
  15. Vierether Kuckucks-Ei e.V.
  16. Walheimer Forum e.V.


Fora

  1. Anti-Castor-Forum
  2. AtomWiki


Anti-nuclear Companies

  1. Salinas Salzgut GmbH


see also:

Some past events

Although this seems a long list of anti-nuclear events in Germany, it is just an extract, basically covering what we learnt about - the real amount of activities must have been much, much higher. Particularly the first 2 years covered here (2009 + 2010) are not representing a realistic impression of anti-nuclear events in Germany.

2017

October

September

August

July

June

May

07/05/2017 at 5 PM

April

March

February

January

2016

December

November

October

September

August

  • Gorleben devotions at Gorleben Crosses: 28/08/2016 at 2 PM
  • Gorleben devotions at Gorleben Crosses: 21/08/2016 at 2 PM
  • Gorleben devotions at Gorleben Crosses: 14/08/2016 at 2 PM
  • BISS Sunday walk outside Eckert & Ziegler company site in Braunschweig: 14/08/2016 at 2 PM
  • BfS mobile final repository exhibition at Paulsplatz in Frankfurt/Main: 10/08/20616 - 13/08/2016
  • mobile nuclear invigilation/KONRAD walk starting from "Schacht 1", in Salzgitter-Bleckenstedt: 12/08/2016 at 5 PM
  • BfS-Infomobil stall in Braunschweig: 11/08/2016 at 9.30 AM
  • working group "Umgebungsüberwachung Schachtanlage Asse" public meeting at Info-Stelle Asse, Am Walde 1, in Remlingen: 10/08/2016 at 3 PM
  • "Büchel ist überall - atomwaffenfrei jetzt!" at nuclear weapons site in Büchel: 26/03/2016 - 09/08/2016
  • Sunday walk at uranium enrichment facility (UAA) in Gronau: 07/08/2016 at 2 PM
  • Gorleben devotions at Gorleben Crosses: 07/08/2016 at 2 PM
  • KONRAD vigil at monument in Salzgitter-Lebenstedt: 05/08/2016 at 11 AM
  • Asse II related A2K meetig in Remlingen: 01/08/2016 at 7 PM
  • anti-nuclear vigil at Gänseliesel in Göttingen: 01/08/2016 at 6 PM

July

June

May

April

  • manifestation and cultural party "Tschernobyl 30 Jahre und kein Ende" at Biblis NPP: 24/04/2016 at 2 PM
  • breakfast mile: "Aus Tschernobyl und Fukushima lernen - wir lassen uns nicht über den Tisch ziehen!" at VW road outside Schacht Konrad in Salzgitter: 24/04/2016 at 11 AM
  • BISS Sunday walk outside Eckert & Ziegler company site in Braunschweig: 10/04/2016 at 2 PM
  • mobile nuclear invigilation/KONRAD walk starting from "Schacht 1", in Salzgitter-Bleckenstedt: 08/04/2016 at 5 PM
  • KONRAD vigil at monument in Salzgitter-Lebenstedt: 08/04/2016 at 11 AM

March

  • ASSE anti-nuclear vigil at Bankhaus C.L. Seeliger, Lange Herzogstr. 63, in Wolfenbüttel: 04/04/2016 at 6 PM
  • Konrad devotions at Konrad-Stein in Salzgitter-Bleckenstedt: 20/03/2016 at 2 PM
  • mobile nuclear invigilation/KONRAD walk starting from "Schacht 1", in Salzgitter-Bleckenstedt: 11/03/2016 at 5 PM
  • KONRAD vigil at monument in Salzgitter-Lebenstedt: 04/03/2016 at 11 AM

January

  • mobile nuclear invigilation/KONRAD walk starting from "Schacht 1", in Salzgitter-Bleckenstedt: 12/02/2016 at 5 PM
  • nuclear waste conference in Göttingen: 06/02/2016
  • KONRAD vigil at monument in Salzgitter-Lebenstedt: 05/02/2016 at 11 AM
  • Sunday walk at Morsleben repository starting at the site in Morsleben: 31/01/2016 at 2 PM
  • trial against a critic of the right wing open aspects of Holger Strohm's anti-nuclear film "Friedlich in die Katastrophe" at district court, Sievekingplatz 1, 2nd floor, room A 265, in Hamburg: 21/01/2016 at 2 PM
  • protests at Federal Minister of Environment's visit in Salzgitter: 19/01/2016
  • film screening "Unser gemeinsamer Widerstand" at Altonaer Museum, Galionsfigurensaal, in Hamburg: 14/01/2016 at 7 PM
  • Fachgruppe Schacht Konrad meeting at KONRAD-Haus in Salzgitter-Bleckenstedt: 12/01/2016 at 5 PM
  • Regionalkonferenz "Grohne abschalten" in Hannover: 09/01/16 at 11 AM
  • mobile nuclear invigilation/KONRAD walk starting from "Schacht 1", in Salzgitter-Bleckenstedt: 08/01/2016 at 5 PM
  • "Kanaldörfer gegen KONRAD" action planning meeting at KONRAD- Haus in Salzgitter-Bleckenstedt: 08/01/2016 at 6.30 PM

2015

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2014

Dezember


November


October

16, in Bielefeld: 09/10/2014 at 7.30 PM

  • Monday vigil outside Sparkasse, Werderstr., in Müllheim: 06/10/2014 at 6 PM
  • Monday vigil at Neutorplatz in Breisach: 06/10/2014 at 6 PM
  • Asse anti-nuclear vigil and additional programme at Bankhaus C.L. Seeliger, Lange Herzogstr. 63, in Wolfenbüttel: 06/10/2014 at 5 PM
  • trial against an activist of a 2013 Neckarwestheim NPP blockade at Local Court in Besigheim: 06/10/2014 at 11 AM
  • manifestation against the uranium enrichment facility and Sunday walk in Gronau: 05/10/2014 at 1.30 PM
  • International Uranium Film Festival at Babylon cinema in Berlin: 29/09/2014 - 03/10/2014


September


August


July


June


May

April

March

February

January

2013

December

November

October

  • action "1 AKW ist nicht genug – mehr Tempo beim Atomausstieg!" at Bundesumweltministerium, Stresemannstr. 128-130, in Berlin: 31/10/2013 at 1.15 PM
  • lecture and discussion "Aufstieg und Fall der deutschen Atomindustrie" at Kulturkneipe F24, Frauenstraße 24, in Münster: 30/10/2013 at 8 PM
  • Gorleben devotions at the Gorleben Cross: 27/10/2013 at 2 PM
  • lecture "Fukushima 360° - Das atomgespaltene Leben der Opfer von Hiroshima und Fukushima" at Wasserturm Lüneburg, in Lüneburg: 26/10/2013 at 6 PM
  • movie screening "Die Protestmacher" at Cinema Münster, Warendorfer Str., in Münster: 23/10/2013 at 7 PM
  • action outside the coalition negotiations of the new elected parties: "Energiewende nicht ausbremsen!" at Potsdamer Platz, Berlin: 23/10/2013 at 5 PM
  • Anti-Atom-Herbstkonferenz in Hamburg: 18/10/2013 - 20/10/2013
  • Gorleben devotions at the Gorleben Cross: 20/10/2013 at 2 PM
  • Gorleben devotions at the Gorleben Cross: 13/10/2013 at 2 PM
  • regional conference "Shut down Grohnde NPP" at Alte Polizei, Obernstr., in Stadthagen: 12/10/2013 at 10 AM
  • movie screening "Unser gemeinsamer Widerstand" at Herz As, Norderstr. 50, in Hamburg: 11/10/2013 at 7 PM
  • Gorleben devotions at the Gorleben Cross: 06/10/2013 at 2 PM
  • Asse -II- Koordinationskreis meeting at Fachhochschule, Salzdahlumer Str. 46, room 120, in Wolfenbüttel: 02/10/2013 at 7 PM

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2012

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

  • excursion to the Morsleben final repository: 29/02/2012
  • Autobahn action day against the Nuclear Waste Transport to Ahaus and afterwards manifestation at the research center Jülich: 25/02/2012
  • Sunday walk at the interim repository Ahaus: 18/02/2012 at 2 PM
  • nuclear waste conference at Antroposophisches Zentrum, Wilhelmshöher Allee 261 in Kassel: 17/02/2012 - 18/02/2012
  • Asse atomic waste walk at the parking lot at the "Assewirtschaft" in Wittmar: 12/02/2012 at 2 PM
  • Fukushima vigil at Breiter Weg/Ernst-Reuter-Allee in Magdeburg: 11/02/2012 at 12 PM
  • public assembly at Schloßplatz in Stuttgart: 11/02/2012 at 7.30 PM
  • International vigil: Fukushima is everywhere at Frankfurt/Main airport Terminal 1 A/B: 11/02/2012 at 1 PM
  • Demonstration aginst the governments final disposal policy at Brandenburger Tor in Berlin: 09/02/2012 at 1.30 PM
  • open gathering of the Aaachen anti-nuclear action alliance in Café Opera in Aachen: 06/02/2012 at 7 PM
  • Sunday walk at the Neckarwestheim NPP at "Schöne Aussicht": 05/02/2012 at 2 PM
  • Sunday walk at the uranium enrichment facility at Röntgenstr. in Gronau: 05/02/2012 at 2 PM
  • strategy and action conference "energy battles in move(movement)" at Mehringhof, Gneisenaustr. 2 in Berlin: 03/02/2012-05/02/2012
  • International Uranium Conference in Münster in Scharnhorststr. 100: 04/02/2012 at 10 AM

January

2011

2010

2009


Materials

  • Security check of the German NPPs - find out which German NPPs would have to be closed if certain security features would be taken seriously


See also

Wikipedia.png Wikipedia has more info on this topic.


Further reading


Background information


External links


  1. 1.0 1.1 Nuclear Power
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Public Acceptance of New Technologies pp. 375-376.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Gottlieb, Robert (2005). Forcing the Spring: The Transformation of the American Environmental Movement, Revised Edition, Island Press, USA, p. 237.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Nuclear Power in Germany: A Chronology
  5. The German Greens and the nuclear industry
  6. Energy and Now, the Political Fallout, Time, June 2 1986
  7. Germans Arrest 300 In Antinuclear Protests
  8. West Germans Clash at Site of A-Plant New York Times, March 1, 1981 p. 17.
  9. Nuclear Power in Germany: A Chronology
  10. Violence Mars West German Protest New York Times, March 1, 1981 p. 17
  11. UIC. Nuclear power in Germany.
  12. Reuters. UPDATE 1-Germany's RWE says Biblis B reactor is restarting.
  13. Nuclear Power Cannot Save the Climate
  14. Nuclear Waste Reaches German Storage Site Amid Fierce Protests
  15. Police break up German nuclear protest
  16. 16.0 16.1 For protection against automatical email address robots searching for addresses to send spam to them this email address has been made unreadable for them. To get a correct mail address you have to displace "AT" by the @-symbol.
  17. http://www.netzwerk-antiatom.de/l/antiatom-buendnis-niederrhein as at June 21, 2012
  18. http://www.netzwerk-antiatom.de/l/aap-kassel as at June 21, 2012
  19. http://www.netzwerk-antiatom.de/l/anti-atom-buendnis-giessen as at June 21, 2012
  20. http://www.nadir.org/nadir/initiativ/bewegungsmelder/location.htm as at June 23, 2012
  21. http://www.netzwerk-antiatom.de/l/atomerbe-obrigheim as at June 15, 2012
  22. http://www.netzwerk-antiatom.de/l/bi-antiatom-ludwigsburg as at June 15, 2012
  23. http://www.netzwerk-antiatom.de/l/freischaffende-atomkraftgegnerinnen-moersneukirchen-vluyn as at June 15, 2012

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