Anti-nuclear Movement in Russia

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== Upcoming Events ==
 
== Upcoming Events ==
 
* '''[[Action:Infotour Around The Baltic Sea|Baltic Sea Info Tour]]''' in Summer 2010
 
* '''[[Action:Infotour Around The Baltic Sea|Baltic Sea Info Tour]]''' in Summer 2010
** July 6th-8th: stop in St. Petersberg - 3 days of action, information events and network meeting; topics: nuclear waste transports, uranium waste transports, NPP + lifetime extension, ship terminal for radioactive materials, new Leningrad NPP
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** July 6th-8th: stop in St. Petersburg - 3 days of action, information events and network meeting; topics: nuclear waste transports, uranium waste transports, NPP + lifetime extension, ship terminal for radioactive materials, new Leningrad NPP
** July 27th-29th: stop in Kaliningrad (RUS) - 3 days of action, information events and network meeting; topics: proposed "Baltic" NPP
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Revision as of 11:50, 2 June 2010

Shortcut to this page: http://rus.nuclear-heritage.net

Contents

Upcoming Events

  • Baltic Sea Info Tour in Summer 2010
    • July 6th-8th: stop in St. Petersburg - 3 days of action, information events and network meeting; topics: nuclear waste transports, uranium waste transports, NPP + lifetime extension, ship terminal for radioactive materials, new Leningrad NPP

Nulear Situation in Russia

In Russia these days there are 10 nuclear power plants with a summmary of 31 operating reactors, that cover 15 percent of the country’s electricity needs. In 2004 these reactors produced 21.740 MWe. Seven of the reactors have recently been granted a prolonged enginnered lifetime for 15 years. That means that intended engineered lifetime of aged reactors can increase from their 30 year intended term of service up to 45. Half of the country’s reactors are considered high-risk by experts, eight of Russia’s 10 nuclear power plants are in the European part of Russia, East of the Ural, two others are east of the Urals ― one in Far Eastern Siberia. Civilian nuclear power plants in Russia are owned and operated by the state-owned Rosenergoatom company.

Naukamap2.jpg


Anti-Nuclear Activity

03.11.2008:

'Nuclear monsters' protest of the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant 2

ST. PETERSBURG - “Nuclear monsters” laid a faux foundation for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant 2 (LNPP 2) during a protest in central St. Petersburg a week after the ceremonial laying of the cornerstone for the actual plant’s first reactor in the town of Sosnovy Bor, 80 kilometres west of St. Petersburg, where the actual nuclear station will be built.


05.-15.08.2008:

Anti-Nuclear Camp in Nizhniy Novgorod

Activists from all over europe and russia (about 50 persons) gathered in a 'tent city' near Nizhniy Novgorod to participate in a 2-week anti-nuclear camp, which consisted of demonstrations and protests, music shows, workshops, movie shows & etc., to make the citizens of Nizhniy Novgorod aware of a new NPP that's planned by Rosatom to be built in Novgorodskaya area. 20 Years ago the administration of Novgorodskaya area tried to built another NPP, but due to the public activity the construction was stopped on a 75% completion and never started again. Raids with leaflets & small demonstrations took place all the time, ended up with a final demo & artistic show at the end of a camp. Camp.jpg


18.-23.08.2008:

Anti-Nuclear Camp in Nizhniy Novgorod

The camp located on a river near Nizhniy Novgorod and consisted of about 12 ecologists from different parts of Russia. Lots of workshops (such as protest tactics, nuclear distribution and exploitation, renewables, etc.) and a 10x10 banner 'NO NPP' hanged from the Kremlin wall as a result. Banner.png

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